Should Book Bloggers Only Write Book Reviews?

… No?

Let’s think about this for a moment. Blogs need content. Frequent content. We’ve slowed down here at Booked All Night but we still post regularly. Imagine how many books we’d need to read if every post was a book review.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy reading and there have absolutely been books that I have read in a single afternoon… and also books that have taken me a month to get through (or ultimately decide to stop reading).

When we’re on top of our game we post three times a week here. Best case scenario, that’s 3 books a week, or 1 per week per writer. That’s a lot to ask of someone.

And our identities as book bloggers and book nerds aren’t tied to exclusively to how fast we can read. We also have different fashions, aesthetics, ways of organizing our shelves, crafting hobbies, and even a preferance for bookmarks. We have senses of humor and passions about genre and craft.

If we only stuck to reviews, you would never get to know us.

And, I feel I should mention, when we are over-read (as we often are to keep up with the need for content) we start taking it out on books.

SAY IT AIN’T SO!

But it is. Sometimes, it’s better to take a break in between books (Yes, yes it is) so that you can appreciate the next one better. This goes double for bloggers/reviewers.

So, no. We shouldn’t only be posting reviews. We should also be posting discussions, critiques of writing craft, lists of our favorite moments, collections of beautiful covers, and all the other wonderful things that make book nerds so wonderfully nerdy.

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Published by J. M. Tuckerman

J.M.Tuckerman is a neurodiverse writer with a big education. She holds an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults, an MA in Writing, and a BA in Writing Arts (specializing in Creative Writing, New Media Writing, and Publication; concentrating in New Media Production), which she somehow managed to earn despite her three very loud and large dogs. Jessica was lucky enough to intern at Quirk Books and Picador, USA while earning her master’s degrees. Her service dog, Ringo, is very proud of all that she has accomplished and hopes to be on a back cover of a published book with her very soon. An avid reader, writer, and lover of young adult and middle-grade literature, Jessica’s bookshelf is overflowing with hardbacks, paperbacks, and a million half-filled notebooks. She is a proud fur-mommy to two lab/st-bernard littermates, a retriever-mix service dog, and one orange little hobgoblin cat, all of whom have made very audible appearances on the Booked All Night podcast.

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